Tag Archives: Victory Boardwalk

2013 Victory Boardwalk

I got a chance to ride the Victory’s 2013 Boardwalk motorcycle. First things first I have a “Harley-Davidson Brain” but you can’t beat the quality of Victory motorcycles. So I am a fan of most of the Victory motorcycles that are manufactured. I have said this many times if they didn’t make Harley-Davidson motorcycles my ass would be sitting on a Victory motorcycle. I think that the Freedom 106 engine is pretty much bulletproof. But I do have some reservations about their big touring motorcycle. I think I’ll stop here.

Okay, not a big fan of a solid white paint job on a motorcycle. I’m sure the color is not called white it’s probably got some weird name like “Desert White” or “Midnight White.” It sure looked like regular old white to me. I have a Harley-Davidson Softail Deluxe with a white and dark blue paint job, although I have on several occasions thought about the logic behind the paint scheme for this motorcycle. Oh, now I remember, I like to wash it a lot.

So it’s not that I don’t like white, it’s I just don’t see an application for solid white paint on a motorcycle. Maybe, the paint was on sale from the manufacturer. From a psychology point of view, the color white projects purity, cleanliness, and neutrality. Are these the traits you want your motorcycle to project?  I didn’t think so!

Nice powerful engine on this motorcycle. The Boardwalk is equipped with Victory’s Freedom 106 engine.  I don’t know much about the Polaris Corporation, but I do know that when they put together an engine, you can’t beat it. The 106 is a 50 degree V-twin with four valves per cylinder. So it’s not going to have any problems breathing. The engine has a wet sump configuration.  Not a big fan of a wet sump without water cooled cylinders. But the upside is this baby holds 5 quarts of oil. That should be enough so the oil can do its primary job. Plus there’s a big oil cooler in the front of the engine near the bottom of the frame. Engine cooling relies on air and oil. A very nice six speed gearbox is incorporated into the engine to make use of the available torque.

Like the adjustable brake lever on the throttle side of the handle bars. Not something that you readily see on cruiser motorcycles. Really a nice touch if you’re one of those people who makes use of the adjustment on the levers. Otherwise, pretty much the same old standard controls on the handlebars. The mirrors are placed nicely and provide a good size picture of what’s going on behind you.

During my demo ride I did encounter some sort of weird feedback on the clutch lever when the motorcycle is in the fifth or sixth gears. During the last bit travel on the clutch lever it would bounce in your hand. I’m pretty sure that that’s not a manufacturer’s defect, probably some sort of a wear problem due to the beatings these demo bikes take.

This motorcycle has tons of chrome. The lower casings on the engine and the frame are not chrome, but pretty much everything else is. I don’t know if I like the Art Deco style turn signals. I prefer a larger turn signal that would leave a larger impression in someone’s brain so they don’t run me over. The handlebars seemed very comfortable to me. I heard other people at the demo ride complaining about them. Victory refers to them as ”beach bars” referencing a trend in older motorcycles.

All of the tactical information such as speed, rpm, gear position and all the other stuff that I can’t remember right now are displayed on the unit. Yep, this is what’s called “real-time” writing. All of this info is being displayed on a single gauge mounted near the center of the handlebars. In the beginning I wasn’t feeling this display set up. But the information is delivered in a format which has grown on me, so I guess I’m feeling it now.

This motorcycle gets up and goes! That’s really the best way to describe it. I think the maximum horsepower and torque occur somewhere around 3200 RPMs. The motorcycle’s gravitational pull on the earth is right around 700 pounds with all the necessary fluids to operate it. So that’s pretty much in the ballpark of its competitors. I’m not completely sure since I don’t have any factual or hard data, but I think it can out run the majority of its competitors.

My favorite personality trait of this motorcycle is the chromed laced wheels. I’m starting to see a trend which causes me a lot of pain. Manufacturers are moving more and more towards either casted or machined rims. Call me old-fashioned, out of date and one foot in the grave, but I like those chrome laced wheels. I feel that the laced wheels are part of the DNA of a true cruiser motorcycle.

If you’re interested in purchasing a cruiser motorcycle I definitely would stop off at a Victory dealer and ask for a test ride. With that said I would also check out the Harley-Davidson, Honda, Triumph, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Indian, BMW, Ducati and Moto Guzzi dealers. It’s important to find out what really moves as opposed to what you have been programmed to think will move you.